Cathedral Gardens

Community, Worship, Culture

Cathedral Isle of Man is set to become a first-class visitor destination,  with the creation of  a unique series of interactive gardens which not only tell the story of the birth and growth of Christianity on the Isle of Man, but also provide a harmonious and beautiful setting in which to walk, relax, and be refreshed.  

The creation of the gardens is an on-going process, and we are deeply grateful to the team of enthusiastic volunteers, some of whom are working on maintenance of the completed gardens and others continuing the development of new ones.

This webpage is under construction, more pictures and detail will be added as time allows.

 

Content

 

 

Birdseye View of Cathedral Gardens

 

Introduction: Many Ways to View the Gardens

 

1 St German’s Way

 

2 The Maughold Garden 6th century

 

3 The Keeill Garden 7th - 9th century

 

4 The Cross Garden 10th - 11th century

 

5 The Sudreys Garden 12th - 13th century

 

6 The Abbey Garden 13th century

 

7 The Franciscan Garden 14th century

 

8 The Tynwald Garden 15th - 16th century

 

9 The Bishops’ Garden 17th century

 

10 The Manx Garden 18th Century

 

11 The Methodist Garden 19th century

 

12 The Presidents Amphitheatre

 

13 The Knockaloe Garden 20th Century

 

14 The Cloister Garden 21st century

 

15 The Peace & Reconciliation Garden

 

16 The Young People’s Hub

 

17 Bishop Wilson’s Gate

 

18 The Archibald Knox Garden

 

19 The Tower Piazza

 

So where do we go from here?

 

Thank you for visiting.

Introduction: Many Ways to View the Gardens

The Cathedral Quarter, which embraces the Island’s Cathedral, its community hub and grounds is undergoing major reconstruction. Gardens are being built which can be read in a variety of ways, largely over the same journey. This Guide looks at the design of the gardens indicating the Christian narrative and on occasion alludes to a range of the other subject areas when particularly appropriate. Packs are available for young people that explore the gardens through the eyes of history, science, art, health, play and spiritual reflection, some of the themes of which are indicated below:

History

  1. Christianity @ Cathedral IOM: The story of how Christianity has engaged with Manx culture century by century from its arrival in the 5th century to the present day (There are 12 historic gardens and 7 themed )

 

Science

  1. Animal @ Cathedral IOM: Highlighting the unique fauna associated with the Isle of Man e.g. the Manx Cat

 

  1. Vegetable @ Cathedral IOM: Plants dating from 360 million years ago (ferns) to the Present Day

 

  1. Mineral @ Cathedral IOM: The Geological history of the Isle of Man from 470 million years ago to the present

 

  1. Mathematics @ Cathedral IOM: The Mathematics underlying creation:e.g. The Golden Ratio andFibonacci sequence

 

Health

  1. Well-being @ Cathedral IOM: Exploring health issues and the Cathedral garden, everything from paths associated with reflexology to plants for healing

 

Art

  1. Art @ Cathedral IOM: A celebration of contemporary public Art in the Landscape

 

  1. Knox @ Cathedral IOM: Gallery 7 in the Landscape to include replica jardinières and other landscape features associated with Archibald Knox (6 other Galleries will be located in the Cathedral Quarter buildings)

Play

  1. Play @ Cathedral IOM: Woodland play, dinosaur trail, mini-beasts and bees

 

Spiritual Reflection

  1. Reflective Walk @ Cathedral IOM: for those wanting to reflect on our world or pray

 

What you can see?

 

1 St German’s Way

 

The History

The route will celebrate the arrival of St German (disciple of Patrick to the Isle of Man as first Bishop in 447AD. This makes it the second oldest dioceses in the Church of England – 150 years older than Canterbury.

 

The Design

A new pedestrian entrance route from the Derby Road will be aligned with the main Cathedral doorway while at the same time linking it to the Cathedral Hall and car park. At the point the route meets the Derby Road there will be a combined Lychgate/town centre bus terminus.  Along the route once restored will be a set of gates, believed to have been made in France and dated 1762, have come to the Cathedral via the Nunnery, Douglas where they gave carriage access to parts of the kitchen garden.

Today

The Lychgate will mark the permeable boundary between the sacred and the secular and celebrate the arrival point in Peel by those using public transport.

2 The Maughold Garden 6th century  

 

The History

Today Maughold is one of the most important sites of this early period of Christianity and is thought to have been the principle monastery on the Isle of Man with elements dating back to the sixth century.

 

The Design

The planting scheme represents a beach landscape including the colours associated with the Manx tartan. (The colours in the tartan are: purple representing the heather, blue for the sky, yellow for the gorse, green for the hills and white for the clouds or limewashed buildings.) The visitor arrives at the start of their garden journey as if rising from the sea (represented by the grass Festuca glauca ‘Elijah blue’ and Erigeron karvinskianus ‘Mexican Fleabane’ representing the froth of the waves).  In the centre will be a spring/well head, representing the Holy Well at Maughold, being designed by Neil Milsom, while the seat takes its inspiration from the coracle, a boat used during this period and traditionally associated with the legend of Maughold. Maughold, a violent Irish Prince, was converted by Saint Patrick and as a penance for his previous life was cast adrift off the Ulster coast in a coracle and swept to the Island. (This image is visible in the Cathedral on one side of the Bishop’s crozier in the Treasury.)

The pebbles on the beach in this garden represent the key rock formations associated with the Isle of Man. Maughold (like Patrick in Ireland) is connected with the tradition of expelling snakes from the Isle of Man. Some species, common in the British Isles, are not found on the Isle of Man among them: snakes, squirrels, moles, badgers and foxes.

Today

There has been a revival of Celtic spirituality in recent times drawing its inspiration from the natural world with its wild and elemental characteristics as a reminder of God’s gifts and continuing presence.

3 The Keeill Garden 7th - 9th century    

 

The History

The second wave of Celtic missionary activity came from Iona, Scotland. A major feature in the landscape became the keeill (a small chapel). There are thought to have been over 170 Keeill sites, by tradition one in each ‘Treen’ which is made up of 4 Quarterlands (Woods Atlas of 1864 indicates 171 Treens). Foundations date back to the seventh century. The fragment of the Calf of Man crucifixion is thought to have come from a chapel altar and is one of the most important examples of early Christian art. A replica has been incorporated here as the altar piece.

 

The Design

The keeill is a replica of Lag-ny-keeilley, which is located on the west coast not far from the village of Dalby. The walls are topped with turf. On the northern exterior wall of the Keeill is a representation of the Dalby Plate tectonics and Manx Slate deformed by two ancient continents (Gondwana and Laurentia), once 5,000 kilometres apart colliding, with the remnant of the Lapetus ocean in between.

 

The garden will have a deep set circular seating area set within a hollow mound in the landscape which encourages visitors to linger and appreciated the sky.

 

The Isle of Man because of its isolation has some species of animals unique to the Island that would have been known to the Celts such as the Manx tail-less cat. Regrettably other local breeds such as the Manx Horse have been lost.

Today

While Keeills may have largely disappeared there are a huge number of Churches and chapels in the landscape each with their story to tell.  Some house ancient Celtic crosses.

 

 

4 The Cross Garden 10th - 11th century          

 

The History

The Celtic peoples of the Island, from as early as the late 8th century, began to experience Norse invasion and this is reflected in their art.  The crosses in this garden reflect the transition as the Norse population began to mingle Nordic myth and Christian symbols.  The turbulence of the period is indicated by the number of silver hordes discovered. 

 

The Design

Three circles in this garden will represent the round towers that were characteristic of the period and associated with monasteries, especially in Ireland.  A quarter segment of the only Round Tower on the Isle of Man, on St Patrick’s Isle is built with its doorway high above the ground, possibly for defensive reasons (to the rear of the tower is the herringbone stone pattern also visible on an ancient building on St Patrick’s Isle).  The low sandstone wall will be topped by a bench that suggests a Norse longship, the circumference represents the tower at Kilkenny which our diocese is twinned with. The paving will have a circle, representing the largest round tower in Ireland, written on it will be a text from ‘The Chronicles of Man’ that speaks about the Viking invasion.   Set in the paving will be silver coins representing hoards discovered relating to this period.  The Lonicera nitida hedge represents the waves of the sea and the Fuchsia hedge with its blood red flowers represents battles such as Sky Hill in 1079. 

Dominating the garden are five crosses showing the transition from Celtic to Norse Art (from left to right they are: The Lonan Wheel head cross, Gaut’s Cross, Thor’s Cross, Thorlief Hnakki’s Cross and finally Thorwald’s Cross).   In the case of Thorwald’s Cross, only a fragment of the original remains and is used by Manx National Heritage – a Christian holding a fish which is a symbol of Christianity.  We have sought the best academic advice to re-create the cross to suggest what it might have looked like when complete and in the landscape.  Thorwald’s Cross is unique in having the story of Christ on one side and the parallel stories of Thor on the reverse.  In the surrounding Isles there is evidence of crosses having been painted and it is assumed they were painted here too, though no traces of pigment remain.  

 

While the Manx crosses were carved from slate, our only Round Tower is made of red sandstone unique to Peel.   Peel was once famous for herring fishing and kippers.  We know that the kippering process was known to the Norse people. 

 

Today

The influence of Celtic design is visible everywhere on the Island; the revival beginning with Archibald Knox in his Art Nouveau/Celticdesigns for Liberty of London.

5 The Sudreys Garden 12th - 13th century     

 

The History

The Kingdom of Man and the Isles emerges as a significant power in the Irish Sea composed of the Isle of Man and four groups of Western Isles known collectively as the Sodorenses or Southern Isles (They are Southern Isles from a Norwegian perspective). This period saw the emergence of Tynwald as the pattern of government, while the church came under the direction of the only English Pope (Nicholas Breakspear, Adrain IV) came under the Province of Nidaros, Norway (1154-1542).

 

The Design

The proposal is to lay mosaic paving down forming a map) of the Island Empire of the Sudreys, which takes as its inspiration the mosaic flooring to be found at Madaba, Jordan.

The Madabamap Is a floor mosaic dating from the 6th century located in the church of Saint George. The Map is the oldest surviving cartographic depiction of the Holy Land and Jerusalem.

The map will indicate the extent of the Sudreys and some of the most important ecclesiastical sites as far as the Island empire was concerned will be highlighted (Bangor, Douglas, Iona, Furness, German, Rushen, Sabal, St Bees and Whithorn).  The planting around the Map is being laid out using a white planting scheme and includes the Glastonbury Holy Thorn (Crataegus monogyna 'Biflora')which flowers twice a year.  According to legend Joseph of Arimathea visited Glastonbury with the Holy Grail and thrust his staff into the ground, which grew into the Holy Thorn.  A sprig is sent to the Monarch every Christmas.  

Today

The Diocese of Sodor and Man, today only consists of the Isle of Man.  The Sudreys are now part of the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Argyle and the Isles. 

6 The Abbey Garden 13th century        

 

The History

The Celtic Church after the Council of Whitby (664) became increasingly subject to the Latin world. This was the age of the great European Monastic Orders with their routine of study and labour interspersed with prayer eight times a day. The most important houses on the Island were Rushen Abbey and the Priory at Douglas, which were both Cistercian communities. ‘The Chronicles of the Kings of Man and the Isles’, the first history of the Island, was written in Latin by the monks of Rushen during this period.

 

The Design

Labyrinths became a feature in the period with the one at Chartres, France being best known and created circa 1200. There is no historic evidence for labyrinths existing on the Isle of Man, but it represents the influences coming from continental Europe. This has been constructed of contrasting imported stones from Bali. Marked on the Labyrinth are the names of the religious houses having property on the Isle of Man. (Rushen Abbey, Douglas Priory, Rievaulx Abbey Yorkshire, Whithorn Priory Galloway, Furness Abbey Cumbria, Bangor Abbey Ulster, Sabal Abbey Ulster, St Bees Priory Cumbria.) Around the labyrinth is an Apple tunnel which sits on the same size footprint as the Cloister at Rushen Abbey.

 

The angular elements of the garden around the labyrinth are filled with plants used by the monks in their different roles. The Kitchener (looked after the meals), the Chamberlain (cared for the house), the Sacristan (cared for the Abbey church) and the Infirmarian (cared of the sick). The Cistercians were great sheep farmers, the unique breed of sheep on the Island is the Loaghtan.

7 The Franciscan Garden 14th century

 

The History

New Christian movements from Europe prior to the Reformation began to influence the Island. Among them were the Franciscans who in 1373 built a friary at Arbory.

 

The Design

The theme of the Garden is St Francis’ Song of Creation; he is also the patron saint of ecology. The garden has a border of ‘limestone foundations’ indicating the size of the Friary chapel in Arbory. The roadway which enables access for further building works at the Cathedral will have tyre tracks of granite setts (A). The double border reflects the five senses and parallels them with the verses of the Song of Creation composed by St Francis [sight=sun (yellow) and moon (silver), sound=wind and air (grasses), touch=water (blue) and fire (red), taste=fruit and herb (edible), smell=death (black and purple). Accompanying these gardens are carvings reinforcing these senses (B). Poles will indicate the Island’s geological strata and divide the gardens into different senses (C), while a dovecote will symbolise peace (D). There is a backdrop of a double line of Bay trees (E).

Today

Respect for the natural world is vital for human survival. The Cathedral has been awarded an Eco Church silver awardby ‘a Rocha’ and is committed to caring for God’s earth. We are also a partner of UNESCO Biosphere, Isle of Man.

8 The Tynwald Garden 15th - 16th century    

 

The History

The relationship between church and state was symbolised by the presentation on Tynwald Day to the Lord of Man of the three Reliques of Man (thought to have been pastoral staffs belonging to saintly bishops of old). The period saw the Lords of Man (which had passed to the Stanleys in 1406), beginning to curb the power of the church by requiring the bishop and five other ecclesiastical barons in 1422 to swear fealty to him in person or forfeit their temporal rights. By 1540 the monasteries were dissolved and only the Bishop retained his barony.

 

The Design

There is a spiral pathway to the summit of the snail mound acting as a viewing point over the gardens. The mound is wheel chair accessible and echoes Tynwald hill (A) with a flat surface at the top which will have a compass (B). The sculpture at the top will represent the conflict between church and state and reference the Reliques of Man (C). The slopes of the mound are covered with Hypericum (St. John’s Wort), (D) providing an additional pun relating to Tynwald.

Today

Tynwald still meets in the open air at St John’s on July 5th (old midsummers day)with the clergy still playing a part in the ceremony. Worn in a button hole is Bollan Bane (Mugwort)   associated with St John. Mugwort can be found in the Abbey garden.

9 The Bishops’ Garden 17th century     

 

The History

The Island became caught up with the English Civil War, which resulted in the execution of the Lord of Man, James Stanley, 7th Earl of Derby at Bolton in 1651 and after the ‘Restoration’ the execution of the patriot Illiam Dhône in 1663. The ‘Restoration’ brought the reinstatement of the Diocese of Sodor and Man in 1661 with three Bishops making their mark in education: Isaac Barrow, Baptist Levinz and Thomas Wilson.

 

The Design

The landscape draws its inspiration from the gardens at Bishopscourt as sketched by Daniel King of Chester during the period. Bishopscourt, Kirk Michael, was the home of the Bishops of Sodor and Man from the 13th century until the late 20th century. This garden is on a much reduced scale and has brick paths dissecting the beds of a formal knot garden of box. The Sculpture to be erected celebrates the value of universal education on the Isle of Man which had its tentative beginnings during this period.  

Today

The sale of Bishopscourt in 1980 had a number of consequences for our Island Church. The Bishop’s chapel of St Nicholas at the house had acted as the pro-cathedral for about 200 years. The sale of Bishopscourt meant that a new Cathedral had to be found. The Island’s churches voted for the parish church in Peel, which fortuitously a hundred years earlier was built in the hope that it would become the Cathedral. In 2011 the role of Dean and Bishop were separated.

10 The Manx Garden 18th Century       

 

The History

The Reformation did not give the Manx Church a liturgy in its own language (Latin was exchanged for English). The eighteenth century, however, saw serious attempts to engage with the Manx language. Bishop Hildesley oversaw the development of the Prayer Book in 1765 and the Manx Bible 1773. This helped save the Manx language laying the foundation for its re-birth in 20th century.

 

The Design

This celebrates the Manx language, so plants will be labelled in Latin, English (and where possible Manx). The setting of the gardens is woodland with a canopy of trees overhead which limits the planting material that can be used. The plants are laid out in rows as if text in a book with the path being the spine of the book. The planting scheme is in the pink spectrum. The colour pink symbolizes love and nurturing and in psychological terms hope. The garden offers hope for the future of the Manx language and culture. The motto of the Gaelic Manx Society 1899: ‘Gyn shengey, syn cheer’ (without language, without country) will be inlaid on the path.

 

Stepping stones lead to a viewing point that overlooks the Apse.

Today

Today the Manx language has experienced a revival being taught in all primary schools and with one school in St John’s (Bunscoill Ghaelgagh) teaching all subjects through the medium of Manx. The translation of the Bible into Manx has made this possible. 2019 marks the two hundredth anniversary since the Bible was first published in Manx in a single volume. The UN has also designated 2019 as the Year of Indigenous languages.

11 The Methodist Garden 19th century         

 

The History

The nineteenth century saw the flowering of Methodism with the first Methodist chapel being built in Peel in 1777. By the end of the 19th century, there were almost 150 chapels, dominantly Wesleyan, though with a significant number of Primitive Methodists. The strength of the movement lay in its ability to connect with working class people, both urban and rural becoming a major political and cultural force.

 

The Design

The vegetation in the garden represents woodland planting with hellebores, snowdrops, primroses, bluebells, foxgloves, aquilegia, ajuga reptans, lily of the valley, ferns, Japanese wood anemone and other woodland plants with hazelnut trees above.

 

The woodland garden has the outline in quartz of a typical rural cottage that might have housed as many as a dozen people in two rooms. Each quartz stone (often used during the 19th century to provide a decorative trim to a garden) represents one of the 32 Methodist Chapels on the Island in 2019. A slate bench known as a ‘bink’ was a common feature of the Croft garden. Coloured posts will be used to represent the total number of Methodist chapels on the Island in their hay day, which some have put as many as 200, with red representing the proportion of Primitive Methodist Churches and grey representing Weslyan Methodism.

 

A piece of figurative art might pay homage to Sophia Morrison (1859 – 1917) who was a Manx cultural activist who worked with the Manx Language Society. Sophia Morrison lived in Atholl Street, alongside the Cathedral.

Today

In our post-modern world Christianity in the West has seen declining numbers attending church. Anglican Cathedrals in recent years have, however, have been bucking this trend.

12 The Presidents Amphitheatre         

 

The History

This garden continues the theme of Methodism. Wesley was famous for his preaching in the open air. The most famous open air site is at Gwennap Pit, Near Redruth, Cornwall, where there was a natural amphitheatre. It became his favourite outdoor preaching place. Wesley called it ‘the most magnificent spectacle which is to be seen on this side of heaven.’

 

The Amphitheatre also tells the story of the new office of the President of Tynwald. The first holder being Sir Charles Kerruish in 1990 with four subsequent holders of the office to date:

                        Hon Sir Charles Kerruish in 1990           Hon Noel Quayle Cringle 2000

                        Hon Clare Christian 2011                         Hon Stephen Rodan 2016

 

The Design

Pete Yarwood has carved the masks of Comedy and Tragedy from local sandstone that mark the upper entrance to the theatre. The Theatre uses as a backdrop to the stage area the Cathedral walls which act as a natural sound board to the theatre.

Today

The small amphitheatre is designed primarily for impromptu performances by young people, but will be used during Art Festivals and liturgical activities that take place in the Cathedral grounds.

 

 

 

13 The Knockaloe Garden 20th Century        

 

The History

The 20th century saw two wars on an industrial scale with many technological inventions and a new level of globalisation. Despite this globalisation the world was divided through war and barriers. The Church was forced to come to terms with these wars and especially genocide with people blaming or abandoning religion. During World War I and II, because of its geographical isolation, the Island became the home of internment camps, with Knockaloe (located a mile from Peel housing 24,500 people in World War I, the equivalent of half the then population of the Isle of Man and the largest camp in the British Isles) with a smaller camp at Douglas. In World War II boarding houses were used in Douglas, Onchan, Ramsey, Peel and Port Erin for internment and Axis prisoners of War.

 

The Design

The garden represents the world and its two hemispheres, each of which are divided into north and west, east and south. In the centre of the two hemispheres is an abstract sculpture. The four gardens round this structure represent people coming to Knockaloe as enemy aliens whose backgrounds represented peoples from the four corners of the world. An example of an improbable alien is the story of the Mexican Indian:

 

            ‘…there were some very surprising 'enemy aliens' amongst us; we were, in fact, quite             cosmopolitan. One … bore the name of Schulz-about as common in Germany as that             of Smith is in England. … Schulz knew no language except Spanish. He was born in             Mexico and looked a full-blooded Mexican Indian, but his name was Schulz, and so he had been arrested on board some ship and brought here.’ Paul Cohn-Portheim

 

These four gardens also represent genocide in the 20th century in the north, south, east and west. Each of the gardens is based on a fable associated with a genocide. The tree in the middle of one hemisphere is a Horse chestnut planted on what would have been Anne Frank’s 80th birthday (she looked out on a chestnut from her attic window). At the centre of the other hemisphere is a concrete post from Knockaloe.

The Knockaloe Garden: Sculpture

Central to this garden is the bronze and stainless steel sculpture by Angela Patchett representing two global figures associated with the Internment camp, Archibald Knox and Joseph Pilates. Joseph Pilates, an ‘enemy alien’, within the constraints of internment invented exercises that are now used the world over. Archibald Knox, Celtic-art-nouveau ‘ghost designer’ for Liberty of London and Prior of St. Germain was a censor at the camp. The sculpture pays homage to these two figures.

The West: The Nazi Holocaust 1938-1945 – 6 million Jewish deaths

Fable: Little Red Riding Hood

The Nazis saw in the fable of Little Red Riding Hood, the girl representing the German people being harassed by the wolf representing the Jewish people. The allies banned the fable immediately after World War II.

 

The fable of Little Red Riding Hood is about a little girl in red visiting her Granny in the woods, but the wolf disguises as Granny to trick the child and cause her harm, however the huntsman comes to her aid and saves Little Red Riding Hood.

Little Red Riding Hood and the wolf will be represented by topiary – you can see the framework in place. The wood is represented by the birch trees. (The word Birkenau in Auschwitz-Birkenau means Birch tree Meadow).

The North: The Ukraine Holodomor Forced Famine1932-1933 – 7 million deaths

Fable: Kotyhoroshko

The Kotyhoroshko fable is from the Kiev cycle and was banned by The Soviet Union, who tried to stamp out Ukranian folk traditions.

 

The Kotyhoroshko fable tells of six sons who go to plough a field and they ask their sister to bring lunch. The sister is told to follow the furrow marks to the field, but a Serpent cuts a new furrow leading to his hideout, which led to the capture of the girl. The brothers searching for their sister are also captured. Their mother gave birth to another son called Kotyhoroshko. The boy had supernatural strength and set out to find his brothers and sister. On finding them he overpowers the serpent, but those freed do not recognise their brother and when he is asleep tie him up to steal the Serpent’s treasure, they later discover it is their brother.

The serpent will be represented by yew topiary – you can see the framework in place.  The forest is represented by the ‘Scots Pine’.  Much of the 30km exclusion zone around Chernobyl north of Kiev is Scots pine which turned orange after the disaster of the Nuclear Reactor.

The South: Rwandan Genocide 1994 – 800,000 deaths

Fable: Sebwgugu and his wife

This fable was told by a 12 year-old boy Ruzigamanzi orphaned by the genocide. He learnt it from his parents.

 

Where Sebwgugu and his wife lived there was a severe drought. Sebwgugu's wife, however, found in the wood a thriving pumpkin patch which sustained them. Sebwgugu suggested to his wife that the patch be weeded to improve the crop. She disagreed, however Sebwgugu weeded the patch and the supplies dried up, so she ran away.  She stumbled upon a house filled with food and no one at home, so she ate and went to bed. That night a monster appeared asking for help to unload what he was carrying, but instead she locked him out. Next day Sebwgugu found his wife. She told him about the monster and told Sebwgugu not to help him if he returned. The monster returned and ignoring his wife's warning assisted the monster who ate Sebwgugu. His wife killed the monster with an axe. Then the house owner returned; he had been frightened away by the monster. Impressed by the woman’s beauty and bravery he married her.

The Rwandan landscape is represented by palms while the monster is represented in yew topiary – you can see the framework in place.

The East: Nanjing Massacre 1937-38 300,000 deaths - China generally countless millions

Fable: The Willow Pattern

Minton (Stoke on Trent) in the 1790’s, was inspired by Chinese blue and white porcelain from places like Nanjing and invented the fable of the Willow Pattern.

 

There was a wealthy Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter (Koong-se) who had fallen in love with her father's humble accounting assistant (Chang), angering her father. He dismissed the young man and built a high fence around his house to keep the lovers apart. The Mandarin was planning for his daughter to marry a powerful Duke. The Duke arrived by boat to claim his bride, bearing a box of jewels as a gift. The wedding was to take place on the day the blossom fell from the apple tree. On the eve of the daughter's wedding to the Duke, the young accountant, disguised as a servant, slipped into the palace unnoticed. The lovers escaped to a secluded island.

 

One day, the Duke learned of their refuge, so he sent soldiers, who burned down their house and they were transformed into a pair of doves.

The Garden is based on the Willow Pattern

 

Today

We recognise that ethnic cleansing continues, so we recall the words of Martin Niemöller:

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.
Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

14 The Cloister Garden 21st century   

 

The History

This century is under two decades old, but has seen some traditional Churches come to the gradual realisation that a society based on Christian values can no longer be assumed with the church being just one of many life-styles available in our post-modern world. In the first years of the century the church is gradually moving from a reactive pastoral model of ministry to one of mission.

 

The Design

The lawn in the middle of the cloister development (yet to be built) is a sandstone sculpture that deals with one of the key challenges for church and state in the 21st century - refugees associated with war and some would argue climate change.

 

The sculpture created by Pete Yarwood is of an over-sized teddy bear, dropped by a fleeing child in a ruined city. It has echoes of Jesus and his family fleeing to Egypt to escape a massacre by Herod. A second ‘temporary ‘ lawn is located on the footprint of the proposed Cloister. The waves represent refugees travelling across the sea.

 

South Cloister to be added to the Cathedral

Today

A bundle of belongings is not the only thing refugees bring to a country.   Two famous refugees include: Albert Einstein who fled Nazi Germany and Steve Jobs, Founder of Apple, the son of a Syrian Refugee brought a good deal more through their intellect.

 

15 The Peace & Reconciliation Garden

 

The Theme

Intrinsic to this garden is the War Memorial honouring those who died in the Two Great Wars and in the Afghanistan Conflict. The War Memorial, as with many on the Island, is associated with a Celtic Cross.

The Design

The garden forms part of the visual approach by pedestrians to the Cathedral from Atholl Street and heightens the drama of approaching the Cathedral’s ‘West’ front.   The garden offers a place for reflection in the hope of peace. The War Memorial Cross forms the gnomon of a Sundial. There is a line across the lawn indicating 11am winter time (remembering the Armistice on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. Radiating from the War Memorial are three avenues, two of which will terminate with sculptures having the feel of Knockaloe bone sculpture representing peace and have the simple phrase: ‘May peace prevail on earth’ in a host of languages carved on the surface. The idea of Peace Poles was first thought of by Masahisa Goi in 1955 in Japan and the movement aims to erectsymbols of peace in every city in the world encouraging people to pray for peace.The third avenue is from the entrance gates.

Today

A Prayer from the Franciscan tradition: ‘Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love, Where there is injury, pardon; Where there is doubt, faith; Where there is despair, hope; Where there is darkness, light; And where there is sadness, joy. O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console, to be understood as to understand, to be loved, as to love.’

16 The Young People’s Hub

The Dinosaur Trail and Woodland Play Area

 

The History

The area around the Knockaloe Garden will be designed as a Wilderness Educational Play area for young people of pre-school and Primary school age. Educationally the area tells the story of plants over a 360 million period, to this will be added woodland play equipment (balancing pole, stepping stones, logs etc.), bug hotel, reading and picnic area, recycling area and drinking fountain.

 

The Design

Entrance to the garden will be via a tunnel and a stumpery. The tunnel will give a sense of entering a secret world. The 11 new trees planted in this area straddle millions of years of evolution, even before there were dinosaurs. The oldest plants are the Ferns 360 million years (m.y.), while the oldest tree is the Maidenhair (Gingko products such as tea come from this plant). There is also the rarest tree in the world is the Wollemia Pine dating back 250 m.y. (The Wollemia is classed as ‘critically endangered’).   In 1994 a group of 100 trees were discovered, prior to this it was only thought to exist as a fossil. There is a Monkey Puzzle (200 m.y.) and a Magnolia Grandiflora (140 m.y.) which is one of the earliest flowering plants and required beetles to pollinate it as bees did not appear on the planet until 130 m.y. ago. The birch tree has been around for a mere 20 m.y.

Today

‘The Gospel is for the planet as well as people’ A Rocha U.K.

Our beautiful earth has taken millions of years to evolve, let us live sustainably in it.

 

17 Bishop Wilson’s Gate     

The Theme

The western entrance gate is a celebration of the life of Bishop Wilson, whose episcopacy was the longest recorded in Sodor and Man. He was Bishop for 58 years from 1697 – 1755. He is remembered primarily for his pastoral care, building and restoration of churches and perhaps less well known for his interest in reforestation.

 

The Design

The Wilson Gate of the Cathedral is currently the most dramatic entrance to the Cathedral, but is ‘hidden’ in the townscape of Peel. The Centenary Centre wall to the north will have a mural which draws its inspiration from Bishop Wilson’s elaborate bureau housed in the Manx Museum, Douglas. The panels will have ‘reliefs’ of nine of the key churches that Bishop Wilson built or extended.  

 

Either side of the entrance are beds surrounded by box hedging containing pot marigolds and Agapanthus and rising out of these is an avenue of 12 pairs of pleached Beech trees (11 the Common Beech and 1 a Copper Beech). Bishop Wilson was alarmed at the deforestation of the Isle of Man and encouraged tree planting. The Avenue of Green Beech symbolise the 12 trees planted by Bishop Wilson at his home of Bishopscourt to represent the disciples, with the Copper Beech symbolising the tree that died and was always spoken of as the Judas tree. The present trees were planted in 2012 in honour of the Queen (The Lord of Mann) on her Diamond Jubilee. Eventually it is hoped to have a rill running down the centre of the drive.

John Henry Newman (later Cardinal) described him as:

‘A burning and shining light … he seemed like the Baptist in an evil time, as if a beacon lighted on his small island to show what his Lord and Saviour could do in spite of man’

Today

Thomas Wilson remains an inspiration in the Church of our own day.  His love for the Isle of Man is visible in his portrait in the Cathedral. Conventionally Bishops had their portraits painted with a hand on the Bible, instead Bishop Wilson has his hand on a Map of the Island.

18 The Archibald Knox Garden   

 

Archibald Knox (1864-1933) is synonymous with the British Art Nouveau/Celtic silverware of Liberty of London. He also founded the League of St Germain in 1896 which sought the ‘recovery of the religious houses on St Patrick’s Isle’ and proclaimed himself ‘Prior’. Knox dream of a restored Cathedral and monastic community, anticipates the ministry of George Macleod at Iona. His tangible contribution to the project is a silver alms dish and Lavabo dish and jug. They were the last pieces made by Knox before his death and are housed in the Cathedral Treasury.

 

The sunken garden is typical of Arts and Crafts gardens of the early 20th century. The garden pays homage to Knox and local Architect Mackay Hugh Baillie-Scott as well as reflecting the influence of the more well-known Architect/Garden partnership of Edwin Lutyens and Gertude Jekyll.

 

The garden uses a hot colour scheme (yellow, orange and red) of herbaceous plants and has a strong architectural structure built by people from Jurby prison.

 

The artwork at the approach of the garden represents unearthed treasure and is by Pete Yarwood, echoing the gems to be discovered on the Island relating to this period. The benches are those designed by Lutyens. We plan to commission jardinières based on a design by Knox.

Today

Knox dream of a restored Cathedral and monastic community, anticipates the later ministry of George Macleod with the restoration of Iona Abbey in 1938 and the founding of the ecumenical Iona community.

19 The Tower Piazza  

 

The Theme

The challenge of the piazza immediately in front of the Cathedral’s main door is to give it a sense of ‘place’ enabling it to fulfil, the function of a setting for photographs in association with weddings and events and a gathering place, while at the same time linking together the Gothic Cathedral with the Arts and Crafts style Cathedral Hall, the pedestrian entrance to the Cathedral Gardens and the limousine entrance to the Cathedral for weddings etc.  

 

The Design

The paving needs to tie together the Piazza and its buildings (A), the pedestrian entrance to the Cathedral Gardens (B) and the new portico on the Cathedral Hall (C)

Today

We remain greatly indebted to our many benefactors who have enabled this Cathedral to develop. The Cathedral Hall, itself, was given by the Corrin family who also built what was the vicarage and is now the Deanery. Recently the old Annex has been converted into the Song School.

 

So where do we go from here?

 

A great deal of work has now been undertaken in the gardens so that while they are not yet complete they are open to the public, who will be able to see them as they progress.  It will be some time before the landscape begins to mature, and a good deal longer before all the artwork has been commissioned and is in place.

 

Request for plants

If you have plants in your own garden that you would be able to donate to the Cathedral or would be happy to propagate plants for us we have a list of things we require.

 

Volunteering

We also welcome volunteering - might you consider being responsible for the upkeep of a small garden – perhaps with a friend? A gardening Club operates on Mondays between 9.30am and 5.30pm

 

Sponsorship

We are always delighted if people would like to sponsor some aspect of the garden. Here’s a sample of what a gift can buy. All gifts are recorded in the donation book which is on permanent display.

Sponsor a Garden

Cost for gardens range from: Manx Garden (£10,000) to St German’s Way with its Lychgate and bus terminal (£600,000)

 

£10,000 - £600,000

Sudreys Garden

The mosaic of the Sudreys

 

£20,000

Sculpture, Public Art. Fountain

The cost varies enormously – please enquire

 

£1,500 - £50,000

Gates

Pedestrian, Vehicular (3 sets required)

 

£4,000 - £10,000 each

Benches

Standard bespoke bench for site to designer bench e.g. Norse-long ship bench

 

£300 - £5,000

Trees

Variable costs

 

£70 - £150

Hedging

Yew, Beech, Griselinea, Hydrangea, Bay

 

£20 - 40 per linear metre

Bulbs

Narcissus, Crocus, snowdrops, trulips etc.

£20- 40 per square metre

Individual plants

Various

£5.00 - £15.00

 

 

 

Thank you for visiting. We hope you will come again to see the gardens as they develop. Meanwhile we wish you every blessing in your onward pilgrimage.

 

 

 

 

The Dean      The Very Revd. Nigel Godfrey, Deanery,

                        Albany Road, Peel, Isle of Man IM5 1JS

                        T: (01624) 844 830  

                        E: dean@cathedral.im

Regular Services Calendar

Sundays

8.30am Eucharist
10.30am Worship with Eucharist
3.30pm Choral Evensong (during term time)

Weekdays

9.00am Morning Prayer (Monday – Saturday)
5.30pm Evening Prayer (Monday – Saturday)
9.30am Eucharist (Wednesday and Holy Days)

The Cathedral hosts special services to celebrate events in the community, and the seasons of the Church year. Click here for more details.

Opening times

You are always welcome in the Cathedral, whether for worship or just to look around, learn more about the history, or perhaps simply to enjoy some quiet time on your own.

The Cathedral is open daily from 9am to 6pm.

We are open all year round, though opening hours may vary slightly on Bank Holidays and Holy Days.

Cathedral Isle Of Man Events

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Sung Evening Prayer

20/11/2019 17:30 - 18:00

Cantor led congregational singing of evening prayer in the choirstalls.

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Cathedral Eucharist (Cantor Led) - Christ the King

24/11/2019 10:30

Setting: Mass of St Thomas (Thorne) | Solo: O Salutaris Hostia (Rossini) | Voluntary: Prelude in C (Bairstow)

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Choral Evensong for Friends Of The Cathedral Music

24/11/2019 15:30

Responses: (Dunleavy) | Psalm: 72 | Canticles: Stanford in C | Anthem: Halleluiah Chorus (Handel) | Voluntary: ‘Thanksgiving’ (Purvis)

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The Big Table Cafe

25/11/2019 12:00 - 14:00

Share a freshly cooked hot meal with friends old and new - irrespective of your means. Every Monday (except some bank holidays) in the Corrin Hall.

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Cathedral Isle Of Man News

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Christmas Services

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Visit of our Patron HRH The Princess Royal

Visit to Labyrinth

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Wachet Auf!

A very special end to our 2019 season of concerts.

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Music Outreach

Workshop on Manx Music and Movement.

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Twitter

Cathedral special services

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Visitor Engagement

Visitor Engagement

Seventeen conceptual gardens will be developed, (12 telling the story of our Island and how Christianity has impinged on it and 5 with special themes). Teaching packs will be created also for the Island's schools.